2012 Classes 4-6

Publication 4221-NC (Rev. 12-2010)

4th Class, Monday, February 13, 2012, 8:45am4:00 pm

Building 33, Room H114, GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD.

                                                      

Understanding the Science of Earth’s Cycles, cont.

 

1.   Daily Update with Program Coordinators (8:45 - 9:00)


2.   Carbon Cycle (9:00 – 10:00)

Forrest Hall, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Office for Global Carbon Studies, NASA’s GSFC and UMBC; forrest.g.hall@nasa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

With an integrated system perspective, use examples drawn from current carbon cycle research to

o      Explain the basic underlying science and interactions.

o      Discuss outstanding issues and challenges (e.g., global warming).

o      Illustrate the state of art in earth observing technologies and strategies for environmental monitoring, assessment and prediction.

 

As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand fundamental carbon cycle components and interactions.

o      Understand some of the major advances and challenges in carbon cycle research, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional to global scales (e.g., global warming).

o      Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 

Q & A (10:00 – 10:15)

 

3.   Chemistry in the Atmosphere - Discoveries from EOS Aura (10:15 – 11:15)

Anne Douglass, Ph.D., Aura Project Scientist NASA’s GSFC; anne.r.douglass@nasa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Discuss NASA’s Aura satellite, its capabilities and information it provides.

o      Show images of recent Aura observations of ozone and pollutants in the stratosphere and troposphere.

o      Discuss how observations of atmospheric constituents provide building blocks for the conceptual model of how chemical processes work in the atmosphere.

o      Discuss how observations of atmospheric constituents provide the framework for predicting how the composition will change in the future.

 

As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand how Aura observations are being used quantitatively to improve predictions for changes in the stratospheric ozone layer as atmospheric composition changes.

o      Appreciate the connections between observations, processes, models and 100-year (or longer!) predictions.

 

Q & A (11:15 – 11:30)

 

Break (11:30 – 11:45)

                 

4.  Observing the Living Oceans from Space: The Earth teems with life, supported to a large extent by tiny ocean plants called phytoplankton (11:45 - 12:45)

Bryan Franz, NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group, NASA’s, GSFC; bryan.a.franz@nasa.gov and

 Jeremy Werdell, NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group, NASA’s, GSFC; jeremy.werdell@nasa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

o      With an integrated system perspective, examples are drawn from current ocean research.

o      The applications of satellite-derived ocean color data range from providing the information needed for a more accurate assessment of the role of the ocean in global change to providing a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies.

o      The color images of the Earth's changing land and ocean features will be of significant use in fisheries management, agriculture assessment and coastal zone monitoring.

o      There is no question that the Earth is changing.  Ocean color measurements from space have enabled us for the first time to monitor the biological consequences of that change - to see how the things we do, and how natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life.

o      What can be learned about Chesapeake Bay from such imagery?

 

As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand fundamental interactions and components in ocean dynamics and biology.

o      Understand some of the major advances and challenges in ocean dynamics and biology, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional (e.g., Chesapeake Bay) to global scales.

o       Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 

Q & A (12:45 - 1:00)

 

Lunch (1:00 – 1:30)

 

5.   Ice Sheets: Waking Giants (1:30 – 2:30)

Christopher A. Shuman, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, UMBC and Planetary Geodynamics Branch, NASA’s GSFC;  christopher.a.shuman@nasa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

From a perspective of past climatic data and recent observations:

o      Explain how ice sheets have changed in the past.

o      Show that recent changes of ice sheets are surprisingly large.

o      Discuss the likely reasons for these sudden changes.

o      Illustrate what the future ice sheets might do.

o      Discuss the human and economic impact of these changes emphasizing why ice sheets matter to everyone.

 

As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand processes that drive both slow and rapid ice-sheet response to environmental changes.

o      Appreciate the relevance of ice-sheet change to the global population and economy.

o      Appreciate the importance of satellite observation and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 

Q & A (2:30 – 2:45)

 

6.   Gray Wave of the Great Transformation: A Satellite View of Urbanization, Climate Change, and Food Security. (2:45 - 3:45)

Marc Imhoff, Ph.D., Terra Project Scientist, NASA’s GSFC; marc.l.imhoff@nasa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Discuss land cover change driven by human activity with impacts ranging from loss of biological diversity to changes in regional and global climate.

o      Describe change that has been so pervasive and progressed so rapidly, compared to natural processes, that scientists refer to it as "the great transformation.”

o      Explain how urbanization, or the 'gray wave' of land transformation, is being increasingly recognized as an important process in global climate change.

o      Describe how large urban conglomerates alter the land surface so that both local climate and the basic ecology of the landscape are affected, with consequences to human health and economic well-being.

o      Discuss long-term programs for global and regional monitoring and assessment using a suite of Earth observing satellites to study the interactions between urbanization, biological processes, and weather and climate.

 

As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will gain an appreciation for what we are learning by using these Earth Observatories and how

o      Urban heat islands form and, potentially, how to ameliorate them.

o      Urbanization can affect rainfall, pollution, and surface water recharge at the local level.

o      Urbanization can affect climate and food security globally.

 

Q & A (3:45 – 4:00)

 


5th Class, Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 9:00 am – 3:30 pm

Robinson Nature Center, Columbia

 

Non-positional Leadership: Leading Yourself, Influencing Others

 

1.   Daily Update with Program Coordinators (including NASA debriefing) (9:00 - 9:30)

 

2.   Strengths-Based Volunteer Leadership: Leaving an Environmental Legacy (9:30 – 11:00)

Tracey Manning, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Center on Aging, UMCP; tmanning@umd.edu

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Process participants’ personal best leadership experiences in the context of a transformational leadership model and research.

o      Help participants recognize and claim their transformational leadership strengths.

o      Aid participants to see how their strengths apply to non-positional leadership in a HoLLIE partner organization.

 

As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      Five key transformational leadership practices and their consequences for individuals and groups.

o      From their own experience, their transformational leadership strengths and likely impact.

o      How they could use transformational leadership strengths in their fieldwork.

 

Break (11:00-11:15)

 

3.    Why I Volunteer:  Introduction to Nonprofit Organizations (11:15 - 12:15)

Cathy Hudson, Convener, Howard County Coalition for the Environment; cmhudson@comcast.net

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Highlight key differences in non-profit organizational structure, processes, regulations, and mission and purview from those of for-profits.

o      Highlight several levels of nonprofit groups.

o      Describe advantages of working in the nonprofit arena.

o      Introduce the concept of nonprofit entrepreneurship.

o      Explore how to structure your time to avoid burnout.

 

As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      How the for-profit world differs from the non-profit world.

o      The advantages of volunteering.

 

Travel to Waterford Farm (12:15 – 12:45)


Lunch at Waterford Farm (12:45 – 1:45)


4.   Agriculture and the Environment: Field Trip to Waterford Farm (1:45 – 3:30)

Denise Sharp, Owner, Sharp’s Waterford Farm, Brookville; farmquestions@sharpfarm.com

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Introduce participants to the impact of county farming on the environment.

o      Illustrate responsible farming practices.

 

As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      How agricultural practices can affect the health of the environment in Howard County and the Chesapeake Bay.

o      How agricultural practices can be improved to lessen impact on the environment.

 


6th Class, Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Robinson Nature Center, Columbia

 

Earth System Science with Humans in the Equation

 

1.   Daily Update with Program Coordinators (9:00 - 9:15)

 

2.   International and National Environmental Policies (9:15 – 10:15)

Nathan Hultman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director, Environmental Policy Program,School of Public Policy, UMCP; Associate Director, Joint Global Change Research Institute (a collaboration of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and UMD); hultman@umd.edu

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Discuss how observed and modeled environmental changes impel decision-making and policy from international to local perspectives.

o      Give an overview of international and national policies on climate change.

 

As a result, participants will be able to explain, in laymen’s terms:

o      The basics of international and national policies on climate change, including the key global treaties.

 

Q & A (10:15 - 10:30)

 

Break (10:30 – 10:45)

 

3.   Changing Life (Global to Local) (10:45– 11:45)

Joseph Sullivan, Ph.D., Professor, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, UMCP; jsull@umd.edu

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Discuss the technical challenges and approaches to discerning natural from human-induced global environmental change.

o      Discuss, from a scientific perspective, what is understood from observations and models about change and natural variability in the Earth System, particularly as it relates to the life on earth.

 


As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      Technical challenges involved in detecting environmental changes in life forms and ecologies and in attributing those changes to specific causes.

o      Environmental changes in populations of flora and fauna that seem to be due to naturally occurring cycles and those that seem to be due to human activities.

 

Q & A (11:45 – 12:00)

 

Lunch (12:00 – 12:30)

 

Weather Patterns and Climate Change

 

4.   Relationship between Climate and Weather (12:30 -1:30)

Wayne Higgins, Ph.D., Director, Climate Prediction Center, National Weather Service, NOAA: Wayne.Higgins@noaa.gov

 

Speaker objectives:

o      Distinguish weather and climate.

o      Describe the link(s) between weather and climate.

o      Define climate change and its characteristics.

o      Define global warming.

o      Discuss long-term trends in extreme weather and climate events.


As a result of this presentation and follow-on discussion, participants will understand:

o      The difference between weather and climate.

o      The local manifestations of climate change in our own backyards.

o      The important long-term trends in the mean temperature and precipitation climates of North America and the globe.

o      That the links between trends in green-house gas concentration and trends in weather extremes have not been fully established.

o      That credible extrapolation of trends depends on additional research and future model improvements.

o      That recent progress in our ability to predict phenomena at the interface between weather and climate has been impressive and is serving as a vital component of Earth system science.

 

Q & A (1:30 – 1:45)

 

Afternoon Activity

 

5.   Field Trip to StormCenter Communications, Inc. (1:45 – 4:00, including travel time from Robinson Nature Center and back)

Dave Jones, Founder, President & CEO, StormCenter Communications, Inc., bwTech@UMBC Research & Technology Park 1450 South Rolling Road Baltimore, MD 21227; dave@stormcenter.com

 


Speaker objectives:

o      Discuss what the public understands about climate change and the connection between climate and weather.

o      Discuss the sources of information used by the typical citizen to form opinions on climate and weather.

o      Discuss available tools for use by emergency managers in making climate- and weather-related decisions; include roles of government, industry, scientific community.

o      Discuss the current state of climate services compared to weather services.

o      Discuss the role of the broadcast meteorologist for informing the public about climate change and weather.

o      Suggest ways for class members to disseminate accurate information on climate and weather changes.

 

As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      How the general public perceives climate change and weather prediction.

o      The tools available for decision makers and the public to understand the impacts of climate change.

o      Ways the broadcast media and concerned citizens might increase the climate literacy of the public. 

 

 

_______________________

 

Reminder: Please turn in your top three choices for placement with partners no later than tomorrow, Feb. 23, via email, HoCoLLIE@gmail.com


Comments