2013 Classes 1-3


1st Class, Thursday, April 4, 2013, 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

University of Maryland Extension-Howard County, Ellicott City, MD

 Introduction to Legacy Leadership Environmental Institute

 1.   Welcome: Introduction to Legacy Leadership Environmental Institute (11:00-11:30)

LLEI Coordinators: Cathy Hudson, Tracey Manning, Barb Schmeckpeper, Betsy Singer, Audrey Suhr

 Speakers’ objectives:

o      Coordinators will introduce themselves and welcome the class

o      Explain program format, content, and syllabus (NASA visit, field trips, suggested reading)

o      Develop class norms

 As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      Purpose, logistics and scope of the LLEI program.

o      Their own responsibilities in the program

 2.   Lunch: Meet Your Fellow Legacy Leaders (11:30 – 12:45)

 Speakers’ objectives:

o      Class members will introduce themselves, tell where they live and explain why they enrolled (3 min each).

 As a result, participants will be able to describe:

  o      Who (name) their fellow classmates are

  o      Why they chose to join LLEI

 3.   What Legacy Leadership Means – and Can Mean to You. (12:45 -1:45)

Tracey Manning, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor Center on Aging, UMCP; tmanning@umd.edu

 Speaker objectives:

o      Describe history, varieties, and outcomes of Legacy Leadership Institutes

o      Explore ­environmental rights and legacy responsibilities of earth’s citizens

o      Identify influences on learning and unlearning

o      Expand definitions of leadership to everyday and non-positional leadership

o      Connect individual strengths/passions to non-positional leadership and civic engagement.

 As a result, participants will be able to:

o      Explain what “leadership” and “legacy” means in the context of a Legacy Leadership Institute.

o      Describe a citizen’s environmental responsibility and leadership roles

o      Be more open to acting on behalf of the environment with non-positional leadership.

 4.   The Environmental Volunteer Experience (1:45 – 2:05)

      Tim Titus, Kathy Younkin, Graduates of Howard County Legacy Leadership Institute for the Environment (HoLLIE)

 Speakers’ objectives:

o      Legacy Leaders from prior years will introduce themselves to LLEI class

o      Leaders will share information on their entire HoLLIE experiences.

 As a result, participants will:

o      begin thinking about their own engagement in environmental activities

o      appreciate the potential applications and opportunities as a result of the LLEI course

 Break (2:05-2:20)

         5.   LLEI Partner Presentations (2:20 – 3:45)

 Climate Change Initiative of Howard County (2:20 – 2:30)

Betsy Singer, Co-founder; betsysing@gmail.com

http://www.hococlimatechange.org/

 Howard County Conservancy (2:30 – 2:40)

Meg Schumacher, Executive Director; meg.schumacher@hcconservancy.org http://www.hcconservancy.org/

 Howard County Public School System (2:40 – 2:50)

Karen Learmouth, Coordinator, Elementary Science; KAREN_LEARMOUTH@hcpss.org

http://www.hcpss.org

 The James and Anne Robinson Foundation  (2:50 – 3:00)

Marianne Pettis, Executive Director; mpettis@robinsonfoundation.org

http://www.robinsonfoundation.org/

 Patapsco Heritage Greenway (3:00 – 3:10)

Betsy McMillion, Executive Director; patapscofriend@gmail.com

http://www.patapscoheritagegreenway.org/

 Robinson Nature Center, Howard County Dept. of Recreation and Parks (3:10 – 3:20)

Brian Campbell, Volunteer Coordinator, bcampbell@howardcountymd.gov.; and

Pam Reese, Community Liaison, pareese@howardcountymd.gov

 University of Maryland Extension—Howard County (3:20 – 3:30)

Richard Walter, Area Extension Director, rwalter3@umd.edu

 Objectives for each speaker:

o      Introduce the organization; describe its mission and environmental role in Howard County.

o      Give the participants a good sense of how your organization operates and who or what receives your services or products.

 As a result, participants will be able to explain:

   o      Who the Howard County LLEI partners are.

   o      What they do for the environment.

            Q & A (3:30 – 3:45)

      6.   Upcoming Class, Expectations, Data Sharing, Evaluation (3:45 – 4:00)

 Speaker objectives:

o      Introduce concept of volunteering and earning designation of HoLLIE.

o      Describe literature on environmental opportunities

o      Organize carpools for NASA and collect required information for entry

o      Distribute evaluations

 As a result, participants will be able to explain:

o      What volunteer opportunities may be available

o      How they will get to NASA


2nd Class, Thursday, April 11, 2013, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, Building 33, Room E125, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD

 

What Informed Citizens Need to Know about Earth Systems Science

 Understanding the Tools and the State of Art in Earth Science


      1.   Daily Update with LLEI Coordinators (9:00 - 9:15)

 2.   Satellite Contributions to Understanding the Earth System. (9:15 -10:30)

Claire Parkinson, Ph.D., Aqua Project Scientist, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC); claire.l.parkinson@nasa.gov

 Speaker Objectives:

o      Provide an overview of the value of earth-orbiting satellites for increasing our understanding of the Earth system

o      Provide an overview of the importance of satellites for recognizing and addressing current and future environmental challenges:

o      Earth energy balance

o      ozone hole

o      greenhouse gases

o      atmosphere/land/ocean temperatures

o      land and ocean vegetation

o      Earth’s ice cover

 Break (10:30 – 10:45)

 3.   Sea Ice Changes as a Microcosm of Climate Change (10:45 – 12:00)

Claire Parkinson, Ph.D., Aqua Project Scientist, NASA’s GSFC; claire.l.parkinson@nasa.gov

 Speaker Objectives:

o      Discuss NASA’s research on sea ice over the long term, its capabilities and information it provides.

o      Place the satellite-observed changes in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice into the broader context of climate change.

o      Discuss key factors influencing changing perspectives of sea ice and climate change.

o      Illustrate, through one scientist's career, the changes in research techniques and perspectives related to earth systems science.

 As a result of these two presentations and follow-on discussions, participants will appreciate:

o      The motivations behind space based observing and the technological advances that have enabled satellite observing of environmental processes and effects on local, regional and global scales.

o      The value of satellites in enabling the Earth to be properly viewed as it is -- an “Earth System” comprised of interacting atmosphere, oceans, land, ice, and biological systems operating across multiple scales.

 Q & A (12:00 – 12:15)

 Lunch (12:15 – 12:45)

 Understanding the Science of Earth’s Cycles

 4.   Land-based Hydrological Cycle. (12:45 – 1:45)

                Matthew Rodell, Ph.D., Branch Head, Hydrological Sciences Branch; NASA’s GSFC; matthew.rodell@NASA.gov

 Speaker objectives:

With an integrated system perspective, use examples drawn from current research in the field of hydrology to

o      Explain the basic underlying science and interactions.

o      Discuss outstanding issues and challenges (e.g., Chesapeake Bay watershed).

o      Illustrate the state of art in earth observing technologies and strategies for environmental monitoring, assessment and prediction.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand fundamental hydrological cycle components and interactions.

o      Understand some of the major advances and challenges in hydrological sciences, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional to global scales.

o      Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (1:45 – 2:00)

 Break and travel by cars to Lab (2:00 – 2:30)

 From Satellite Data to Computer Models

       5.   Site Visit to GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio and Remote Sensing Labs  (2:45 – 3:45)

                    Horace Mitchell, Ph.D., SVS Director; Horace.G.Mitchell@NASA.gov

 Speaker objectives:

o      Illustrate how environmental observations are locally and globally acquired, processed, analyzed and integrated with computer models.

o      Illustrate how large-scale environmental observations are visualized in ways that enable new scientific insights.

 As a result, participants will:

o      Gain an appreciation of how understanding complex environmental phenomena is being advanced through combined use of satellite remote sensing and computer models.

 Q & A (3:45 – 4:00)

3th Class, Thursday, April 18, 2013, 9:00 am – 3:30 pm. Building 33, Room E125, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD

                                                

What Informed Citizens Need to Know about Earth Systems Science

 Understanding the Science of Earth’s Cycles, cont.

 1.   Daily Update with LLEI Coordinators (9:00 - 9:15)

             2.   Carbon Cycle (9:15 – 10:15)

                    Compton J. Tucker III, Ph.D., Senior Biospheric Scientist, Biospheric and Hydrospheric Sciences Laboratory, , NASA’s GSFC; compton.j.tucker@nasa.gov

Speaker objectives:

With an integrated system perspective, use examples drawn from current carbon cycle research to

o      Explain the basic underlying science and interactions.

o      Discuss outstanding issues and challenges (e.g., global warming).

o      Illustrate the state of art in earth observing technologies and strategies for environmental monitoring, assessment and prediction.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand fundamental carbon cycle components and interactions.

o      Understand some of the major advances and challenges in carbon cycle research, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional to global scales (e.g., global warming).

o      Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (10:15 – 10:30)

 Break (10:30 – 10:45)

             3.   Ice Sheets: Waking Giants (10:45 – 11:45)

                  Christopher A. Shuman, Ph.D., Associate Research Scientist, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, UMBC and Planetary Geodynamics Branch, NASA’s GSFC;  christopher.a.shuman@nasa.gov

 Speaker objectives:

From a perspective of past climatic data and recent observations:

o      Explain how ice sheets have changed in the past.

o      Show that recent changes of ice sheets are surprisingly large.

o      Discuss the likely reasons for these sudden changes.

o      Illustrate what the future ice sheets might do.

o      Discuss the human and economic impact of these changes emphasizing why ice sheets matter to everyone.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand processes that drive both slow and rapid ice-sheet response to environmental changes.

o      Appreciate the relevance of ice-sheet change to the global population and economy.

o      Appreciate the importance of satellite observation and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (11:45 – 12:00)

 Lunch (12:00 – 12:45)

 4.   Observing the Living Oceans from Space: The Earth teems with life, supported to a large extent by tiny ocean plants called phytoplankton (12:45 - 1:45)

Jeremy Werdell, NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group, NASA’s, GSFC; jeremy.werdell@nasa.gov

 Speaker objectives:

o      With an integrated system perspective, examples are drawn from current ocean research.

o      The applications of satellite-derived ocean color data range from providing the information needed for a more accurate assessment of the role of the ocean in global change to providing a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies.

o      The color images of the Earth's changing land and ocean features will be of significant use in fisheries management, agriculture assessment and coastal zone monitoring.

o      There is no question that the Earth is changing.  Ocean color measurements from space have enabled us for the first time to monitor the biological consequences of that change - to see how the things we do, and how natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life.

o      What can be learned about Chesapeake Bay from such imagery?

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will:

o      Understand fundamental interactions and components in ocean dynamics and biology.

o      Understand some of the major advances and challenges in ocean dynamics and biology, and their relevance to detecting, understanding and predicting environmental changes on regional (e.g., Chesapeake Bay) to global scales.

o       Have a better appreciation for the importance of satellite observing and Earth system computer models to environmental prediction and response.

 Q & A (1:45 – 2:00)

 Break (2:00 – 2:15)

 5.   Gray Wave of the Great Transformation: A Satellite View of Urbanization, Climate Change, and Food Security. (2:15 - 3:15)

Marc Imhoff, Ph.D., Terra Project Scientist, NASA’s GSFC; marc.l.imhoff@nasa.gov

 Speaker objectives:

o      Discuss land cover change driven by human activity with impacts ranging from loss of biological diversity to changes in regional and global climate.

o      Describe change that has been so pervasive and progressed so rapidly, compared to natural processes, that scientists refer to it as "the great transformation.”

o      Explain how urbanization, or the 'gray wave' of land transformation, is being increasingly recognized as an important process in global climate change.

o      Describe how large urban conglomerates alter the land surface so that both local climate and the basic ecology of the landscape are affected, with consequences to human health and economic well-being.

o      Discuss long-term programs for global and regional monitoring and assessment using a suite of Earth observing satellites to study the interactions between urbanization, biological processes, and weather and climate.

 As a result of the presentation and follow-on discussions, participants will gain an appreciation for what we are learning by using these Earth Observatories and how

o      Urban heat islands form and, potentially, how to ameliorate them.

o      Urbanization can affect rainfall, pollution, and surface water recharge at the local level.

o      Urbanization can affect climate and food security globally.

 Q & A (3:15 – 3:30)


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